Nikon at Mumbai Photofair 2010, but its service network is lagging

Nikon India, the 100 per cent subsidiary of Nikon Corporation has claimed that it is all set to delight photography enthusiasts at Photofair 2010 at Bombay Exhibition Centre, NSE Grounds, Goregaon, in Maharashtra’s capital from the 7th to 10th of January. Nikon will showcase its latest innovations, special promotions and activities during the four-day long exhibition, says a press release.

The comments made to the media by Hidehiko Tanaka, Managing Director, Nikon India indicate that Nikon is heavily banking on sales in India. As I have noted elsewhere, the pricing policy adopted by Nikon in India does not give the impression that the company is particularly keen to be competitive. Moreover, its service apparatus in India is weak, built on the rickety foundations of private, informal service centres that started operating before the company made a formal advent in the national market. The scene has changed now for sales, but not for service.

This is quite a contrast with mature photography markets, where clean, professional service environments are as much a priority for Nikon, as sales is.

“The digital camera market has grown at a rate of 50 per cent during the current year and a similar growth pattern is expected for 2010 and we expect India to contribute more to our global revenues. We hope the photography culture in a scenic country like India witnesses more enthusiasts joining the digital imaging bandwagon. I am delighted to launch Nikon School in India, which is set to take photography to a next level,” according to Mr Tanaka.

That is great for revenues, but what about showing some more concern for amateurs, prosumers and professionals who have invested in Nikon equipment over the years, without an iota of support from the company? If I have to clear fungus from a gem of a Nikkor lens, is there a good place that Nikon can recommend, even in the metros? Is there is a specified list of user charges?

At the Mumbai photography event, Nikon will display flagship products such as the Nikon D3S, Nikon COOLPIX S1000pj, D3000 and D5000, the press release says. The topper in compact camera category, the company says, is the COOLPIX S1000pj, world’s first camera with a built-in projector and users can project images and videos as large as 40 inches with just a touch of a button. Great.

The other Nikon limelight products at Photofair are D3000 and D5000. The D3000 is the world’s first D-SLR camera that is equipped with a ‘Guide Mode’ which acts as a friend to the entry level photography enthusiast, guiding him to shoot professional looking images with ease & transforming everyday moments into stunning pictures. The D5000 is world’s first DSLR camera with a 450 degree rotating LCD screen through which the users can view in a normal position fitting securely within the camera back, or swung out to be rotated or tilted.

At the Photofair, Nikon is also showcasing the power of Telephoto Nikkor lenses in photography. Specific areas have been dedicated to these Nikkor lenses where props and models are placed for consumers to get a feel various angles and zooms, the company adds. Nikon’s latest colorful range of COOLPIX compact digital cameras and D-SLR cameras will also be on display in a zone where the visitors can touch, feel, click and experience what is described as “the luxury of a Nikon”.

It is of course nice to note that Nikon has set up a free service camp during the four days of the fair. But life does not end with the photofair, and Nikon should show consumers the courtesy of providing quality service through the year.

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